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Jason Corbett murder retrial – Molly Martens could walk free inside three weeks four years after being convicted

Jason Corbett murder retrial – Molly Martens could walk free within three weeks, four years after being convicted.

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MOLLY Martens could walk free from the prison inside the next three weeks, the Irish Sun can reveal.

Martens and her ex-FBI agent father, Thomas Martens, were found guilty of murdering Limerick man Jason Corbett in the US four years ago.

Jason Corbett murder retrial –  Molly Martens could walk free inside three weeks four years after being convicted
Molly Martens could walk free from the prison inside the next three-week-FBI agents, Thomas Martens.
Scott Muthersbaugh – The Sun Dublin

But they won a full retrial in the North Carolina Supreme Court last week, much to the devastation of Jason’s family.

And now it has emerged the pair could be released from prison in as soon as three weeks when the case is transferred back to their local court in Davidson County.

A source said: “After the (Supreme) court issues a final mandate in the next three weeks, Molly Corbett and Thomas Martens will be transferred to Davidson County. Then their attorneys will ask a judge to set a bond.

“Whether they are set free then all depends on if they can afford it. But last time, they were freed on a $200,000 bond. There’s no trial date set yet. It’ll likely be quite some time before a date is set.”

It is understood a retrial is unlikely to go ahead until 2022.

Dad-of-two Jason, 39, was viciously beaten to death as he slept at his home in North Carolina on August 2, 2015, with his two children Sarah and Jack, asleep upstairs.

Molly and her father were convicted of second-degree murder in 2017 but appealed, saying the judge excluded critical evidence.

The pair said this evidence would have supported their claim they had acted in self-defense and argued statements the children had given to social workers should have been allowed as evidence.

The North Carolina Supreme Court found that the exclusion of statements made by the Corbett children “deprived the jury of evidence that was relevant and material to its role as finder of fact.”