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Half of third-level students intervened in an incident of sexual violence or harassment – survey

According to a survey released today by the Department of Further and Higher Education, HALF OF STUDENTS had intervened as a spectator in the last four years.

Seven out of ten students felt obligated to intervene in such situations, but three out of ten students felt unprepared to do so.

Similarly, 39% felt ‘somewhat’ or ‘completely’ educated.

The Higher Education Authority initiated the study in April last year. Higher education institutions sent it to employees and students.

7901 pupils and 3,516 staff provided a total of 11,417 responses.

The survey found that most students would “likely” confront a friend who planned to give someone alcohol to get sex; challenge a friend who shared private pictures of their partner; check in with a friend who looks drunk when they go to a room with someone else at a party; object to a ‘rape joke’; or challenge a friend who shared private pictures of their partner.

Men were less likely to intervene to stop a ‘rape joke’ and less likely to check in with an intoxicated friend while entering a party area.

“The data hint to some good trends in higher education,” stated Minister Simon Harris.
Notable findings include the prevalence of sexual harassment among staff and students, particularly among female students who reported sexual assault.
The survey indicated that females were more likely to be victims of sexual violence, with 49% describing such experiences.

Students and staff at NUI Galway presented thoughts on themes such as sexual abuse, harassment, consent education, and helping others.
The survey indicated that females were more likely to be victims of sexual violence, with 49% describing such experiences.

Students and staff at NUI Galway presented thoughts on themes such as sexual abuse, harassment, consent education, and helping others.

[…] Most people believed their college would support them, and most supported positive behaviour and active consent.

Along with these qualities, there were information gaps regarding how to file complaints or seek institutional support. We found a high level of sexual violence and harassment among students.
Through these surveys, students and staff around the country have helped us identify key goals for fostering a culture of respect, safety, and consent.
The survey resulted in several recommendations:

There should be a systematic development programme of awareness, education and training sponsored by higher education institutions and promoted as a priority.
Continue to promote simply understood and accessible policies.
Strengthen sectoral competence by sharing examples of good practise
Plan a long-term student experience research strategy
Help victims of sexual violence and harassment.
Morning meeting with experts on ending sexual violence and harassment from the HEA and practitioners from the National Advisory Committee to brief stakeholders and student representatives on findings.

institutions that can help raise awareness and educate others.